This site commemorates the men and women of Collingham, Linton and Micklethwaite who served during World War 1.
Milner, George
(1898-?)

Rank Lieutenant

Service Army

Battalion

Regiment York & Lancaster Regiment

Information

George Milner was born in Leeds in 1898, the son of George Jervis Milner, a secretary at a fancy leather manufacturer, and his wife Emma.

By the date of the census in 1911, the family was living at Wharfe View, Linton and George is also found on the Linton electoral roll in 1915. George Jervis Milner, George's father died on the 29th October 1915.

The circumstances of the death of George Jervis Milner were reported in the Wetherby News:

SUDDEN DEATH IN THE TRAIN
LINTON GENTLEMAN'S FATAL HURRY.
The death took place under sad and sudden circumstances on Friday morning last of Mr. George Jervis Milner, of Wharf View, Linton. Deceased, who was 56 years of age, was secretary to the firm of Messrs. Horsfield Sons and Mackrell Bros., tanners, of Leeds, with whom he had been for 41 years, and left home with the intention of travelling by the 7-3 am. train from Collingham to Leeds. He was pushed for time, and hurried to catch the train - so much so that on getting into one of the compartments he was short of breath and could scarcely speak. Before reaching Bardsey he opened the carriage window, and almost immediately collapsed. A couple of gentlemen in the compartment with him rendered what assistance they could, but before the train reached Thorner he expired. The body was removed into one of the waiting rooms to await an inquest.
Deceased leaves a widow, two sons, and two daughters. One of the sons is a soldier in training at Salisbury, and the daughters are married to Mr B Ryder and Mr E Crampton. Mr Milner, though not long resident at Linton, took an active interest in the affairs of the village, and a fortnight before his death presided at a meeting of parishioners at which a presentation was made to Mr S. Barker.
The internment took place at Burmantofts Cemetery, Leeds, on Tuesday afternoon.
At the Reading Room, Thorner, on Monday morning, Mr P.P. Maitland, the West Riding Coroner, and a jury, held and inquiry into the circumstances. Evidence given by Mt Lionel Myers Beaumont, Collingham, was to the effect that he Mr Milner, and others travelled by the 7-4 am train from Collingham to Leeds and were in the same compartment. When Mr Milner got into the train he was rather out of breath, but said he was “In the pink, thank you: I never felt better in my life.” He further said he had been hurrying.
When the train was between Collingham and Bardsey he got up to put the window down, but before he could do so he collapsed. He was placed on a seat, but expired before the train reached Thorner.
Dr. Tempest, of Thorner, said that, in his opinion, the cause of death was acute dilation of the heart while suffering from aortic disease, the dilation being caused by hurrying to catch the train.
A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

In 1918, George (Jnr) is still on the Linton electoral roll, but is listed as absent due to Naval or Military Service.

George Milner enlisted in January 1915 into the 'Leeds Pals' - the 15th Battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment, with a regimental service number of 15/1165. George was later promoted to Lance Corporal. George first served overseas in Egypt from the 22nd December 1915.

Later in the war, George was granted a commission in the Yorks and Lancs Regiment.

After the war George returned to live in Linton.

If you have any photographs or further details about this person we would be pleased to hear from you. Please contact us via: alan.berry@collinghamanddistrictwararchive.info